Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: dur.gif

 

 

 

Wittgenstein on Scientism

 

Date: Tuesday 3rd July 2012

Venue: The Bailey Room, St John’s College, 3 South Bailey, Durham University

Organiser: Ian James Kidd

 

Sponsors: The British Society for the History of Philosophy, the British Society for the Philosophy of Science, the Mind Association, and the Department of Philosophy, Durham University.

 

Programme

 

Session 1       Chair:  Ian James Kidd

 

9.00                 Jonathan Beale (Reading and Harvard)

                        Scientism and Language-Games

 

9.40                 Bill Child (Oxford)

                        Scientism and Anti-scientism in the Philosophy of Mind

 

10.20               Tea and coffee

 

Session 2       Chair: Mikel Burley

 

10.40               David E. Cooper (Durham)

Naturalism and Superstition

 

11.20               Genia Schönbaumsfeld (Southampton)

                        “Making It A Question of Science”: Wittgenstein and Fr. O’Hara

 

12                    Lunch

 

Session 3       Chair: Benedict Smith

 

1.00                 Ian James Kidd (Durham)

                        Wittgenstein, Feyerabend, and Scientism

 

1.40                 John Preston (Reading)

                        Wittgenstein: Myth, Wonder, and Scientism

 

2.20                 Tea and coffee

 

Session 4       Chair:  James Buckhalter

 

2.40                 Andy Hamilton (Durham)

Is There A Logical Space for a Non-scientistic Naturalism? The Case of Wittgenstein

 

3.20                 Benedict Smith (Durham)

Wittgenstein, Naturalism, and Scientism

 

4.00                 END

 

Aims and description

A striking feature of Wittgenstein’s later writings is his criticisms of various aspects of prevailing cultural attitudes towards the sciences – of how our ‘disgusting, soapy-water science’ is ‘putting man to sleep’, of the role of science in the atrophy of our sense of ‘wonder’, and the remarkable warning that our ‘age of science and technology’ may be the ‘beginning of the end’ for humanity. Although such remarks are clearly central to the later Wittgenstein’s thoughts about science and its relationship to philosophy, it is less clear just what they amount to and how they can be articulated in relation to his wider body of thought. The aim of this workshop is to try to explore and articulate Wittgenstein’s anti-scientism and locate it within the context of his thought and the wider history of twentieth century philosophy.

 

Enquiries

For further information, please contact Ian James Kidd.

 

Return to the home page.