Project Partners

Project Partners

Nick Rosser

My primary research is focused upon the recognition of the role of material deformation characteristics in controlling the spatial and temporal nature of slope failure. My research extends new theoretical models which underpin the most recent developments in the understanding the mechanics of slope failure, from the laboratory to the field. From a risk management perspective this concerns broadly the critical elements of when, where and how slopes fail. I have led the development and use of 3D terrestrial imaging techniques for monitoring slope failure, and we now maintain arguably the most extensive monitoring dataset on rock slope failures worldwide. Original research on rockfall patterns is now being rolled-out into industrial applications in slope safety monitoring systems for mines via collaboration with leading SMEs in this field. More widely, I am actively engaged in research on natural hazards and risk, and the global and local impacts of disasters, reflected in the interests of those in my research group. The nature of this work, including its engagement with emerging technologies, requires interdisciplinary collaborations.

Email: n.j.rosser@durham.ac.uk

GopiGopi Basyal

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Email: gbasyal@nset.org.np

SujanSujan Raj Adhikari

Sujan is a geologist, having more than ten years of local and international experience in the geoengineering and geoenvironmental fields. He started his career working on road sector and hydropower projects, where he spent most of his time borehole logging, geological mapping, and assessing environmental impacts in addition to landslide mitigation work. After joining NSET, Sujan has mostly engaged in disaster risk reduction activities with a focus on natural hazard and risk. This includes earthquake risk assessment, urban and community based disaster risk reduction, and supporting municipalities and village development committees of Nepal.

Email: sadhikari@nset.org.np

 Dr Matthew BrainMatthew Brain

My research focuses on the geotechnical properties of soils and rocks and how understanding deformation processes in earth materials in a variety of environments and at a range of spatial scales can aid our understanding of landform and landscape evolution. In particular, I am interested in developing understanding of deformation mechanisms, styles and rates through detailed laboratory testing, informed by and calibrated with field measurements of stress and environmental conditions. I work with a range of earth materials obtained from geomorphic settings that vary in lithology, from soft estuarine muds and peats to the strong regionally metamorphosed rocks of active orogens, and in terms of the magnitude of ambient stresses. My research has applications in low and high energy coastal geomorphology, rock slope stability, landslide risk assessment, deep mining and Quaternary/Sea Level science.

Email: matthew.brain@durham.ac.uk

 Katie Oven

Katie is a Geographer working at the interface between physical and social science. Her interests include disasters and development in the Global South, in particular, the social production of vulnerability and resilience to natural hazards. Katie is engaged in applied research and works closely with a number of government and non-government partners within the UK and internationally. Her research is structured around two key themes: 1. Understanding the vulnerability and resilience of communities to geophysical hazards; and, 2. Inter/multi/trans-disciplinary approaches to disaster risk reduction

Email: k.j.oven@durham.ac.uk

Jack Williams

My interest in mass-movements stems from a three month internship at the National Society for Earthquake Technology (NSET) – Nepal. During my time in Nepal, I was able to witness at first-hand the effects of monsoon rainfall and earthquakes on the initiation of fatal landslide events, in addition to gathering data for my undergraduate dissertaion entitled “Landslide-inducing rainfall characteristics and their use in early warning systems, as captured by TRMM and rain-gauge data”. My Ph.D. project seeks to develop the use terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to monitor precursory deformation of high-walls in large open-pit mines.

Email: j.g.williams@durham.ac.uk

Colm Jordan

Earth & Planetary Observation and Monitoring research in BGS is led by Dr Colm Jordan, who is also Chair of RSPSoc and sits on the NERC ARSF & NEODAAS Steering Committees and the UKSA EO Advisory Committee. Jordan is project manager for research, FP7 and industrial projects and has led the application of Earth Observation to research projects in diverse terrains from Guyana, Mauritania, Ghana and Madagascar to Papua New Guinea, including leading field teams in those countries. Jordan was Project Manager of the UK activation of the International Space Charter for Montserrat (2008) and coordinated EO data for the UK when it was activated for Nepal by India (2015), including leading production of landslide inventory maps published by the Charter. Jordan has undertaken landslide studies in countries including the St Vincent, St Lucia, Grenada, Slovakia, Papua New Guinea and Madagascar. Jordan was PI of the NERC Urgency Grant following the 2011 Japan Tohoku tsunami. Jordan has hosted national and international scientific meetings on EO and is an invited speaker in Europe, N America and Africa.

Email: cjj@bgs.ac.uk


 

National Society for Earthquake Technology

NSET was founded in 1993 with the vision of “Earthquake Safe Communities in Nepal by 2020”, and are a world leading authority on earthquake risk management.  NSET aims to foster the advancement of science and practice of earthquake engineering and technology for mitigating risk and to further the objectives of the International Association for Earthquake Engineering as applicable to Nepal. NSET has been awarded numerous prizes for their pioneering work. NSET is currently a Partner in the EwF Project, and is developing an expertise on landsliding after recognition of the gap in practical and actionable landslide knowledge in the Himalaya.

Website: www.nset.org.np/

Institute of Hazard Risk and Resilience

Durham University has a long-standing engagement with research into landsliding in the Himalayas, and Nepal. This was primarily through the International Landslide Centre, and the Institute of Hazard Risk and Resilience (IHRR). Durham’s research focus has been 3-fold: (1) the assessment of the impacts of landslides; (2) field monitoring of unstable slopes, with a focus on pre-failure deformation; and, (3) geotechnical testing of rainfall and EQ-triggered landsliding in low stress conditions. These strands of research have been used to: identify countries most vulnerable to landsliding, from which Nepal emerges as a clear focus; to identify the controls on landslide timing and failure style; and, to direct the development of new models to inform risk mitigation. Research at Durham has been supported by industry, government, RCUK, and NGOs, working both on fundamental blue-skies research, and in response to landslide disasters. Researchers at Durham are regularly contacted on advice for management of landslide hazard and risk.

Website: www.dur.ac.uk/ihrr
Website: www.nset.org.np/

British Geological Survey

The British Geological Survey (BGS), is Britain’s national geological survey, and is a non-departmental public body employing around 520 of which are scientists. BGS is the UK’s principal provider of objective geoscientific information, reducing risk and living with the impacts of environmental change.  BGS undertakes high-quality research to underpin its strategic activities and has a track record of undertaking NERC grants, publishing innovative science, and working within as well as coordinating large research consortia. BGS has a team of scientists concerned with geohazards, including landslides. The Earth & Planetary Observation and Monitoring group participate in Disaster Charter activations associated with geohazards, including Nepal 2015.

Website: www.bgs.ac.uk/