Display Records

Displaying results where document jurisdiction is Monastic

Prior of Holy Island’s Accounts

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: MonasticDocument category 1: Priors' or abbots' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place:
Relevant material from 1342 to 1537
Holy Island (or Lindisfarne) was historically the most significant of all the Durham cells, and one of the oldest Christian sites in Northumbria. Given by St. Oswald to St. Aidan as the seat of his new bishopric in 634, it had also been the seat of St. Cuthbert, and hence of the Community of St. Cuthbert, from which the Priory, City and Bishopric of Durham were all derived.


*The records are presented here in draft form and have not had final checking and editing for official publication by REED staff. Permission to cite this material must be sought from REED: Durham editors Mark Chambers and John McKinnell, using the contact form provided on this site.

Sacrist of Coldingham’s Accounts

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: MonasticDocument category 1: Priors' or abbots' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place:
Relevant material from 1363 to 1367
Coldingham had been the site of a famous Anglo-Saxon monastery, which was re-founded by 1139 following grants to Durham Priory from the Kings of Scots. Wars between the English and the Scots led to disputes over control of the monastery, which ended with Durham’s loss of control (to Dumferline) in 1462.


*The records are presented here in draft form and have not had final checking and editing for official publication by REED staff. Permission to cite this material must be sought from REED: Durham editors Mark Chambers and John McKinnell, using the contact form provided on this site.

Prior of Finchale’s Accounts

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: MonasticDocument category 1: Priors' or abbots' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place:
Relevant material from 1365 to 1529
Originally founded as a hermitage by St. Godric in the early 12th century and bequeathed to Durham priory when he died, Finchale became one of the richest of the cells and a place where Durham monks frequently took retirement or holidays.

*The records are presented here in draft form and have not had final checking and editing for official publication by REED staff. Permission to cite this material must be sought from REED: Durham editors Mark Chambers and John McKinnell, using the contact form provided on this site.

Durham Priory Almonry Accounts

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: MonasticDocument category 1: Obedientiaries' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place:
Relevant material from 1367 to 1480
The charitable responsibilities of the Almoner included the welfare of elderly men and women in an infirmary outside the abbey gate, old people’s hostels at St. Mary Magdalen, Durham and at Witton Gilbert, a house for four widows, and the Almonry School, whose schoolroom was immediately above the abbey gate. Although the Almonry Bishop was selected from among the boys of the school, there is no evidence that the Almoner ever received payment from other officers on his behalf; rather, these contributions probably went direct to the expenses of the ceremony, and it seems likely that they were administered by the Master of the Almonry School. After 1474 they went to the Feretrar’s Office, and it is doubtful whether the actual ceremony continued.

Most of the dramatic records in the Almoners\' accounts relate to local folk customs. Records include payments for the folk custom of the harvest goose and perhaps a plough festival connected to it (1337-39ff), to further plough ceremonies (such as those at Elvethall Manor in New Elvet in 1413), as well as numerous regular, usually annual, payments for the Almonry Bishop (Episcopo Elemosinarie) - the Boy Bishop - selected from the boys of the monastery\'s Almonry School.

There are also payments recorded to minstrels attached to noble households, including minstrels Ralph, Lord Neville (later first Earl of Westmoreland, born c.1364, d.1425), his son-in-law Ralph of Lumley (first Lord Lumley, 1384-1400), and Sir Ralph Euer of Witton-le-Wear, Co. Durham (c.1350-1422).

Payment to a ‘Dominus Nicholas’ (Seynteler) appears under ‘Pensiones’ in the account of 1458-9, as master of the children of the Almery School; he appears to have been paid for copying the words and music for the Corpus Christi service and for a service for dedicating a church.

*The records are presented here in draft form and have not had final checking and editing for official publication by REED staff. Permission to cite this material must be sought from REED: Durham editors Mark Chambers and John McKinnell, using the contact form provided on this site.

Durham Priory Feretrars Accounts

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: MonasticDocument category 1: Obedientiaries accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place:
Relevant material from 1376 to 1538
Because the Feretrar was responsible for the Shrine of St. Cuthbert and its relics, his income and status returns provide as much relevant material as his expenditure. His income includes details of payments at processions, especially during the week of Pentecost, both from incumbents who attended and (following a legal process that began in 1398-9) also from those who were absent, as well as some idea of the banners and relics carried in these processions, especially the Banner of St. Cuthbert, which was also used to accompany military campaigns, e.g. Richard II’s Scottish campaign in 1385 and probably the Flodden campaign in 1513, which may explain why it needed repair (Feretrar’s Account 1513-4). It was repaired again in 1536-7 after being damaged by the common people of Durham (perhaps as a result of the heightened sectarian unrest which preceded the Pilgrimage of Grace).

From the mid-1470’s, the Feretrar’s office also received the Boy Bishop payments from other officers of the priory – see the Prior of Finchale’s account 1474-5, Feretrar’s Account 1480-1 and end notes. As there are no Feretrar’s expenses that can be linked to the Boy Bishop, this may imply that the actual ceremony had lapsed and survived merely as an annual levy on the other obedientiaries and cells; this may also explain why the Boy Bishop is not mentioned in The Rites of Durham.

These records are offered in a pre-pub format, meaning they have not yet been through REED\'s vigorous editorial procedures. Permission to use, share or quote the records must be sought from the REED: Durham editors John McKinnell and Mark Chambers.

Prior John de Landa's Accounts

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: MonasticDocument category 1: Priors' or abbots' accounts
From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place: Bolton Priory
Relevant material from 1315 to 0
Prior John de Landa's account includes a reward to the boy bishop of York in 1315.

Durham Priory Chamberlain's Accounts

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: MonasticDocument category 1: Obedientiaries' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Durham
Refers to location(s): County Durham, Durham Priory
Relevant material from 1350 to 1528
[NOTE: The PDF of these records – including the introduction, transcription, translation and notes – have been provided by the REED: Durham editors John McKinnell and Mark Chambers, with the permission and assistance of Durham University Library\'s Special Collections staff. These records are offered here in a ‘pre-pub’ format, meaning that have not yet received REED’s full and official editorial checking and formatting. Permission to use or cite this material must be sought from the editors in any instance.]

The chief responsibility of the Chamberlain was for the provision of clothing. The existing priory Chamberlains\' accounts for Durham Priory survive from the years 1334-1533, but relevant REED material appears only between 1350 and 1528. Most of the Chamberlains\' accounts record gifts (dona) made to the Priory Almonry Bishop, also known as the \'Boy\' Bishop (Episcopus puerili).

Boy Bishop ceremonies featured in Durham, York, Beverley and other places with important churches or cathedrals. On feast days appropriate to children – such as the feast of St Nicholas (who became our familiar modern Santa Claus) or the Feast of the Holy Innocents, the children killed by King Herod – churches would appoint a Boy Bishop from among their choristers, to dress in rich robes like those of a real bishop, go in procession through ‘his’ parish, lead the congregation in prayer and preach a sermon. Durham in fact had two, unusually appointed in the summer; one chosen by the Cathedral, the other – the ‘bishop of Elvet’ – in St Oswald’s parish.

The ceremony of the Almonry or Boy Bishop at Durham provides a good example of how a widespread custom could be adapted to local circumstances. The Almonry School probably opened around 1340, and its classroom was the room above the Abbey Gate. The earliest record of the existence of an annual Almonry \'Boy Bishop\' ceremony is in the 1346-7 account of the Prior of Lytham, a cell of Durham Cathedral Priory. In most other places the ceremony took place either on St. Nicholas’ Day (6th December) or on Holy Innocents’ Day (28th December), but in Durham, the ceremony seems to have taken place either in the week of Ascension Day or around Pentecost.

A note on the manuscripts:
One membrane, length between 474 and 1001 mm., width 199-355 mm. Single column; until 1352 expenses are undivided, but thereafter they are in subsections grouped according to subject matter, at first with a separate line for each item. From 1403-14 there is a tendency to group more than one item into a single line, and in the 1440’s some accounts have continuous subsection paragraphs. From 1448 until 1499 there is gain a separate line for each item, after which continuous paragraphs return until the end of the series.

Terminal dates are usually on the Monday after Ascension, with the following exceptions:

1414 – Monday after Ascension to St. Cuthbert in September (4th September)
1440-1 – Friday before Pentecost to Friday after Ascension
1441-2 – Friday after Ascension
1442-3 – Martinmas to Monday after Ascension
1527-8 – Pentecost.

Durham Priory Cellarer's Accounts

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: MonasticDocument category 1: Obedientaries' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Durham Priory
Relevant material from 1443 to 1444
The Cellarer’s main responsibility was to procure food.

Durham College Oxford Accounts

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: MonasticDocument category 1: Priors' or abbots' accounts
Jurisdiction 2: SchoolDocument category 2: Accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Durham Priory
Relevant material from 1399 to 1402
Durham Priory began to send monks to study at Oxford in the late thirteenth century, but did not found its own college there until 1381, when the initiators of the foundation were Prior Robert Walworth and the dying Bishop Thomas Hatfield. Durham College prospered both academically and financially and became the forerunner of the present Trinity College; Dobson estimates that nearly half of all Durham monks studied there in the last 150 years of the priory’s history, and while this is an exaggeration, its educational importance to the Priory was clearly very great (Dobson, Durham Priory: 1400-1450 [London: Cambridge University Press, 1973], 343-359). We are grateful to Alan Piper for access to his unpublished detailed figures for each decade, which show that between 22 and 34 percent of all Durham monks who were alive at any one time had studied or were studying at Durham College).

Because Durham College had no land, derived its income only from appropriated churches and was expected to maintain eight monks and eight secular scholars, together with all the buildings, books etc. that they needed, it was usual to keep the mother-house’s financial demands on it to a minimum. It is therefore surprising that its only two contributions to the Almonry Bishop of Durham date from the brief period when it was in financial difficulty.

Durham Priory Hostillars' Accounts

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: MonasticDocument category 1: Obedientiaries' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Durham Priory
Relevant material from 1348 to 1481
The chief responsibility of the Hostillar was for the welfare of guests.1 Because he derived part of his income from his lordship of the manor of Elvethall, which was in the parish of St. Oswald’s Elvet, he makes a number of contributions to the parish Boy Bishop known as the ‘Bishop of Elvet’.

Durham Priory Communars Accounts

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: MonasticDocument category 1: Obedientiaries' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Durham Priory
Refers to location(s): County Durham, Durham Priory and County Durham, Durham City
Relevant material from 1416 to 1454
The duties of the Communar were rather limited, including the provision of a number of minor physical comforts for the monks, notably fire and wine, with figs, walnuts and spices during Lent (see Fowler, Surtees Soc. 103, Introduction, xlv-xlvii; The Rites of Durham, Surtees Soc. 107, 101). The account for 1453-4 includes a payment to singers (most likely the cathedral choir?) for a performance in the Infirmary, presumably for aged and infirm monks.

A Note on the manuscripts:
Relevant rolls are one membrane each, length 429-685 mm., width 250-266 mm. Single column, with income and expenses divided into subsections according to subject matter. The account for 1416-7 has a separate line for each item, but thereafter continuous subsections are used. Terminal dates for relevant accounts are usually Pentecost, but the account for 1416-7 runs from St. Romanus (23rd October) to St. Petronilla (31st May, also Whit Monday in that year).

NOTE:
These records are offered in a pre-pub format, meaning they have not yet been through the vigorous editorial procedures for full REED publication (which will take place over the next year). Permission to use, share or quote the records must be sought from the REED: Durham editors John McKinnell and Mark Chambers, with acknowledgement to Durham University Library.

Master of Farne’s Accounts

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: MonasticDocument category 1: Priors' or abbots' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Farne
Relevant material from 1432 to 1537
Great Farne Island was famous as the hermit retreat for St Cuthbert, and from the mid-12th century provided a semi-ermitic life for one or two monks from Durham.

Fountains Abbey Records

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: MonasticDocument category 1: Priors\' or abbots\' accounts
From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place: Fountains Abbey
Refers to location(s): Yorkshire, West, Fountains Abbey
Relevant material from 1455 to 1458
Fountains Abbey was founded in 1132 in the valley of the River Skell southwest of Ripon. Given the natural advantages of the location, Fountains quickly became a prosperous Cistercian community. After economic setbacks in the late 13th- and early 14th-century, Fountains gradually recovered its wealth and influence. By the mid-1450s, the house was attracting many performers: minstrels, boy bishops, fools, story-tellers, players, and a Corpus Christi play. While most of these individuals and troupes had noble patrons, others were identified by their association with a place: Ripon, York, Beverley, Boston, Durham, Topcliffe, Thirsk, and Fountains Abbey itself.

Caret brackets (<…>) set off damaged or illegible parts of the document. Italics are used to indicate extensions of abbreviations. A single quotation mark (\') indicates that the abbreviation mark is omitted or ambiguous.

Master of Jarrow’s Accounts (1313-1314)

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: MonasticDocument category 1: Priors' or abbots' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Jarrow
Relevant material from 1313 to 1314
Founded in 685 as part of the famous twin monastery of Wearmouth, it was famous as the home of the Venerable Bede (c.637-735).

Master of Jarrow’s Accounts (1402 - 1537)

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: MonasticDocument category 1: Priors' or abbots' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Jarrow
Relevant material from 1402 to 1537
Founded in 685 as part of the famous twin monastery of Wearmouth, it was famous as the home of the Venerable Bede (c.637-735).

Prior of Lytham’s Accounts

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: MonasticDocument category 1: Priors' or abbots' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Lytham
Relevant material from 1346 to 1534
Lytham Priory was founded on the north bank of the River Ribble between 1189 and 1194, as a result of a gift from Richard Fitz Roger, a local magnate. It was a relatively prosperous cell that, at times, had a rather mixed relationship with its mother house and with local landowners.

Prior of Stamford's Accounts

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: MonasticDocument category 1: Priors' or abbots' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Stamford
Relevant material from 1383 to 1533
The Priory of St. Leonard outside Stamford was in existence by 1146; it may have been founded by Durham Priory out of a desire for a cell south of the Trent.

Master of Wearmouth’s Accounts

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: MonasticDocument category 1: Priors' or abbots' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Wearmouth
Relevant material from 1362 to 1534
Founded by Benedict Biscop in 674, Wearmouth had been Bede’s first monastery. Along with Jarrow, it was re-founded ca. 1075, having previously succombed to Viking attacks. In the later Middle Ages it was a small and rather impoverished cell.