Display Records

Displaying results where document type is Metropolitical and diocesan visitation articles and injunctions

Boroughbridge Record

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: DiocesanDocument category 1: Metropolitical and diocesan visitation articles and injunctions
Jurisdiction 2: ParishDocument category 2: Churchwardens' accounts
From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place: Boroughbridge
Relevant material from 1589 to 0
The Diocesan Visitation of 1589 provides evidence of the celebration of a traditional local custom at Boroughbridge, the election of a \'summer lord\'. The injunction to the churchwardens of the parish suggests that the ecclesiastical authorities aimed to control, but not to suppress apparently, the festivities associated with the parish event.

Fewston Records

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: Star ChamberDocument category 1: N/A
Jurisdiction 2: DiocesanDocument category 2: Metropolitical and diocesan visitation articles and injunctions
From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place: Fewston
Relevant material from 1596 to 1622
Fewston Records

The records of performance activity in the small village of Fewston arose from conflicts occasioned by rushbearings in 1596 and 1619 brought to the Church of St. Matthew and St. Lawrence. The conflicts led to charges heard in the Archdiocesan Court of York and the Court of Star Chamber. At the time of the first case, Nicholas Smithson was the vicar of Fewston, though he was not directly involved. In the second case, Smithson and three of his sons were the principal defendants, arguing against the complaint of Thomas Herryson, a local husbandman, that they had violently resisted the performance of the local custom and openly criticized King James\' Book of Sports as contrary to the law of God.

In the transcriptions, italics indicate the extension of an abbreviation in the manuscript; an asterisk (*) precedes an item in the left margin; and caret brackets (<…>) set off material that is illegible or lost because of damage.

Leeds Records

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: Star ChamberDocument category 1: N/A
Jurisdiction 2: DiocesanDocument category 2: Metropolitical and diocesan visitation articles and injunctions
From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place: Leeds
Relevant material from 1594 to 1621
Although we have not civic records that document performances in Leeds, the diocesan court of York and the Court of Star Chamber provide evidence of music during the time of divine service, two rushbearings, and two defamatory songs. All the records involve influential civic leaders, such as John Harrison, the \'benefactor of Leeds\'; John Metcalfe, deputy bailiff; Robert Cooke, vicar; and his successor in that office, his brother and curate, Alexander Cooke. The records provide evidence of the conflicts arising from the efforts to strengthen and develop the religious, economic, and political institutions of the borough.

The format of the allegedly libellous songs in both the Star Chamber cases is editorial: we have set the songs as verse to facilitate the reading of them and to break up the single block of text produced by the court scribe.