Display Records

Displaying results from region of Yorkshire, West

Wentworth Household Records

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: FamilyDocument category 1: Correspondence
From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place:
Relevant material from 1612 to 1638
WENTWORTH HOUSEHOLD.
Edited by Sylvia Thomas.

These transcriptions appear with the permission of Sheffield City Council, Libraries, Archives and Information: Sheffield Archives. WWM (Wentworth Woodhouse Muniments): reproduced with permission from The Milton (Peterborough) Estates Company and the Director of Communities, Sheffield City Council (the Wentworth Woodhouse papers have been accepted in lieu of Inheritance Tax by HM Government and allocated to Sheffield City Council).

INTRODUCTION:

Wentworth Woodhouse is in the parish of Wath-upon-Dearne, five miles from Rotherham and nine from Barnsley. It was the seat of the Wentworth family from the fourteenth century.

William Wentworth of Wentworth Woodhouse, baronet (1562—1614), ‘a wealthy Yorkshire landowner whose family had long been established in the West Riding, was lord of two manors and master of a yearly income of several thousand pounds. Something less than a nobleman, something greater than a country squire, he belonged to that rising aristocracy of wealth who counted themselves inferior to none. His wife [Anne] was the daughter and heiress of Sir Robert Atkinson of Stowell in Gloucestershire… Sir Robert had a house in London and it was here that his daughter gave birth to her son’ [Thomas, on 13 April 1593]. [Wedgwood, chapter 1]

Thomas Wentworth, first earl of Strafford (1593--1641), lord lieutenant of Ireland, was the second and eldest surviving son of William Wentworth. He was first elected to parliament in 1614, and again in 1620. His guiding belief was that there should be ‘a harmonious union betwixt the kinge, the nobles and Commons’ in order to achieve successful legislation (Cooper, Wentworth Papers, 153--5) but, as an opponent of the policies of the duke of Buckingham, he became allied to men hostile to the royal favourite.

Wentworth’s first wife Margaret died on 14 August 1622, and by 1624 he was looking for an heiress to be his new wife, eventually settling on Lady Arabella Holles (1608/9 – 1631), daughter of John Holles, first earl of Clare. They were married on 24 February 1624/5.

The influence of Buckingham, and of Sir John Savile, who was also hostile to Wentworth, resulted in the king’s decision to appoint him sheriff of Yorkshire in November 1625, so that he could no longer sit in Parliament. Over the next few years he continued to align himself with opponents of royal policy, refused to pay the forced loan raised to finance the war against France in 1626-7, and was imprisoned from June to December 1627.

Elected a knight of the shire again in 1628, he spoke in favour of the bill of right, whilst at the same time believing that only adequate financial resources would enable the king to govern in accordance with the law and tradition, a principle in which Wentworth had a profound belief. His moderation in opposition earned him elevation to the peerage as Baron Wentworth of Wentworth Woodhouse and baron of Newmarch and Oversley on 22 July 1628. This apparent change of sides was seen as controversial in Yorkshire.

After Buckingham’s death in August 1628 Wentworth was in December created Viscount Wentworth and on 25 December lord president of the north. He was successful in this office but ruthless in his methods, which made him a number of enemies.

His second wife died on 5 October 1631, and he was deeply affected, all the more because her family, with whom he was on poor terms, held him responsible. They had four children, three of whom survived. Wentworth married again in October 1632. His third wife was Elizabeth (c.1614 – 1688), daughter of Sir Godfrey Rodes of Great Houghton, Yorkshire. This marriage produced a daughter, Margaret (d. 1681).

On 12 January 1631/2 he was appointed lord deputy of Ireland, arriving in Dublin on 23 July 1633. Over the next six years he successfully and again ruthlessly exercised power on behalf of the king, increasing revenues for the crown, and also enriching himself, although opposing corruption. He again made powerful enemies. In August 1639 Charles I, whose government was under threat from Parliament and from the Scots covenanters, recalled Wentworth to England to become his chief councillor, making him in January 1639/40 lord lieutenant of Ireland and creating him earl of Strafford. On the illness of the earl of Northumberland, the official commander, Strafford was sent to lead the king’s forces in northern England in August 1640, but the situation was hopeless, and his authority declined rapidly. ‘Black Tom Tyrant’ was held responsible for the king’s disastrous policies and mistakes of the past ten years.

In November the Commons accused him of high treason and impeached him in the House of Lords. Strafford was so skilful in his own defence that the proceedings seemed likely to collapse, but the Commons passed a bill of attainder on 21 April 1641. In the face of intense public hysteria against him whipped up by his enemies the bill was passed and given assent by the king on 10 May (despite an earlier royal promise to save his life). He was beheaded on Tower Hill on 12 May 1641.

[SOURCES:
C.V.Wedgwood, Thomas Wentworth, First Earl of Strafford, 1593-1641: a Revaluation, London, 1961.

Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (ODNB): Thomas Wentworth.

J.P.Cooper, ed., Wentworth Papers, 1597-1628, Royal Historical Society, Camden Fourth Series, vol. 12, 1973.]


*The records are presented here in draft form and have not had final checking and editing for official publication by REED staff. Permission to cite this material must be sought from Sylvia Thomas.



Accounts of Ingram of Temple Newsam

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: FamilyDocument category 1: Household accounts
From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place:
Relevant material from 1612 to 1642
Accounts of Ingram of Temple Newsam*

Sir Arthur Ingram (before 1571-1642), financier and politician, was born in London, son of Hugh Ingram, a tallow chandler of Yorkshire origin and his wife Anne, daughter of Richard Goldthorpe, a haberdasher of York.

Sir Arthur took over his father’s business and became a successful money-lender, gaining influence with powerful men at court. As a result of such support he was returned as a member of parliament for the first time in 1609. An active parliamentarian all his life, Ingram sat for York during the 1620s. He collaborated with Sir Thomas, later Lord,Wentworth at various times during his career, particularly in the late 1620s, but they fell out in the early 1630s, and Ingram resigned his secretaryship. He subsequently attached himself to Henry Rich, 1st earl of Holland, an opponent of Wentworth. Sir Arthur married three times: first (by 1599) to Susan Brown (d. 1613); secondly (in 1613) to Alice Ferrers (d. 1615); and thirdly (in 1615) to Mary Greville. He spent his considerable wealth on building and furnishing his houses. His principal residence in Yorkshire was his house in York, built between 1616 and 1630 on the site of the old archbishop’s palace, next to the Minster. He died on 24 August 1642. He died in York and is buried in the Minster.

Sir Arthur Ingram’s Stewards’ Accounts:

John Matteson was steward for Sir Arthur Ingram. By the 1620s he had general oversight of all Ingram’s northern affairs, apart from the alum industry. He was in charge of estate management, collecting rents, holding manorial courts, leasing property, supervising farming and dealing with tenants and neighbours. He was also in charge of building operations at Sir Arthur’s three houses, at York, Sheriff Hutton and Temple Newsam, and had oversight of the household, sorting out supplies of provisions, and transport of goods and money between Ingram’s London residence and Yorkshire. In addition to all this Matteson acted as Ingram’s treasurer in Yorkshire. Matteson was assisted in his work by his nephew, another John Matteson. Christopher Ellison was also a steward, but he was probably subordinate to Matteson. John Matteson the elder may have died in December 1642, just four months after Sir Arthur.

Edmund Pawson’s notes:

Copies and abstracts from stewards’ accounts (1604—42) from the Temple Newsam archives were made by Edmund D Pawson. Pawson, with Sidney D Kitson, prepared the first guide book to Temple Newsam house after it was bought by Leeds Corporation in 1922. The archive was not acquired by Leeds City Library until 1938. He attempted to create a chronological sequence of entries from the various accounts, not all of which can now be traced among the WYL100/EA MSS at West Yorkshire Archive Service, Leeds. His transcriptions are selective, and do not necessarily help to decipher the handwriting of Sir Arthur Ingram’s steward John Matteson. The three separate hands involved in writing the original accounts quoted here have been identified. John Matteson’s is often very difficult; his servant Richard Stones sometimes wrote accounts on his behalf; Christopher Ellison (‘Kitt’) was also a steward for Sir Arthur Ingram, and wrote some of the accounts.

The Ingram records include evidence of the prominent role of musical performance in the life of a prosperous businessman’s household. Sir Arthur Ingram was willing to spend lavishly on his several organs, which were moved from house to house, even when finances were otherwise tight. He employed an organist, and a number of ‘singing boys’, who travelled to and from his various residences, and he regularly paid musicians to sing and play for himself and his guests. In addition his family owned and played their own instruments, including at least two harps. He also frequently brought in other kinds of entertainers, such as ‘the man that playes the birdes’, ‘the dog’, ‘the tonges’, ’the Jewes trumpes’ and ‘the Jugler’.

In contrast to the family, Sir Arthur’s steward, John Matteson, records many more modest visits to hostelries, where he paid for ‘the musicke’ at convivial evenings with friends.

Sources:
Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (ODNB): Sir Arthur Ingram.
Anthony F. Upton, Sir Arthur Ingram, c.1565-1642: a study in the origins of an English landed family, Oxford, 1961.
Sidney D Kitson and Edmund D Pawson, Temple Newsam, 7th edn, Leeds City Council, 1936.
Edmund D Pawson, manuscript notes (WYL178).
Catalogues to WYL100 and WYL178 at WYAS Leeds.

* These transcriptions appear with the permission of West Yorkshire Archive Service, Leeds (www.wyjs.org.uk/archives). The transcription and accompanying detail are provided by the REED West Riding co-editor Sylvia Thomas.

Thorner Records

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: Star ChamberDocument category 1: N/A
From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place:
Refers to location(s): Yorkshire, West, Thorner
Relevant material from 1619 to 1621
STAC 8/225/30: Oglesthorpe v. Clough et al

In 1620, William Oglesthorpe of Oglethorpe, esquire, submitted a bill of complaint to the Court of Star Chamber alleging that four men had conspired together to defame him with false, malicious accusations of felony. The conspirators were William Clough, the Puritan vicar of Bramham (now \'Bramham cum Oglethorpe\'); his brother Robert Clough of Bramham, husbandman; his kinsman James Beale, also of Bramham; and Clement Stephenson, labourer, of North Dighton. They allegedly soborned John Spink and Richard Sayner, two of Oglethorpe\'s servants, to testify that he had, over the preceding five years, stolen sheep in the manors of Oglethorpe, Bramham, and Clifford. Sir Francis Baildon, JP for Yorkshire, heard their complaint and Oglesthorpe\'s defence and exonerated him.

William Oglesthorpe\'s bill of complaint began with a charge that William Clough had delivered a seditious sermon early in August 1619 in which he objected to a rushbearing at Thorner that some parishioners of Bramham attended and criticized King James I for making laws contrary to the laws of God.

In the transcription of the document, square brackets ([...]) are used to indicate material that is crossed through or otherwise cancelled. Caret brackets (< ... >) mark parts of the text that are damaged or illegible.

Aberford: Court of the Star Chamber: Silltoe vs. Thomson, etc.

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: Star chamberDocument category 1: N/A
From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place: Aberford, Yorkshire, West Riding
Relevant material from 1620 to 1621
Aberford: Court of the Star Chamber: Shilleto vs. Thomson, etc., 1620-21. The record comes from a case brought by Thomas Shilleto against Thomson, Pollard, Lofte, Dixon and others, accusing them of composing verses that denigrated Shilleto in his capacity as High Constable of Barkston Ash and, as a result, discredit him in the eyes of other officers of justice. The case also makes reference to Sherburn in Elmet, South Milford, Ferrybridge, Knottingley, and Pontefract.

Aldborough Records

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place: Aldborough, West Riding
Relevant material from 1585 to 1594
The village of Aldborough is located about 18.5 miles northwest of York. As an ancient parish, it included two townships in the old North Riding of Yorkshire, six in the West Riding, including the three that appear in the records: Aldborough, Boroughbridge, and Roecliff. Relevant REED material appears in the Manorial Court Roll for 1585 (held in the National Archives), the Diocesan Court Book for 1590-1 (Borthwick Institute) and the Diocesan Court Cause Papers for 1593-4 (Borthwick Institute).

Beaumont of Whitley Beaumont Records

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: FamilyDocument category 1: Correspondence
From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place: Beaumont of Whitley Beaumont
Relevant material from 1604 to 1608
Sir Richard Beaumont, of Whitley Beaumont, received letters from Sir Thomas Beaumont and Sir Henry Savile with news of entertainments at court. The first letter (dated 21 February 1603/4) alludes to the pageants prepared by London for King James I\'s coronation entry into the city. The second letter (dated 18 February 1607/8) notes the masque, Ben Jonson\'s \"Hue and Cry after Cupid\", produced for the marriage of James Lord Ramsay, Viscount Haddington, and Elizabeth Radcliffe. The Beaumont collection also contains an undated, highly abbreviated list of dances with choreographies.

In the transcription of the records: an asterisk (*) marks an item that appears in the left margin of the manuscript; diamond brackets (< >) indicate places where damage to the manuscript makes the text illegible; a vertical line ( | ) marks the end of a page in a manuscript; and square brackets set off material that has been cancelled or crossed through.

Beckwith of Selby, Travel Expenses, Steward's Accounts

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: FamilyDocument category 1: Household accounts
From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place: Beckwith of Selby
Relevant material from 1551 to 1555
Sir Leonard Beckwith of Selbywas, according to W. Wilberforce Morrell "one of those enterprising individuals who elevated their social position and built up their houses on the ruins of the monasteries" (The History and Antiquities of Selby (Selby, 1867), 134.In 1541 Selby Abbey had been granted to Sir Ralph Sadler, who received licence from the king in the same year to transfer the manor to Leonard Beckwith. Selby was located on the River Ouse about 14 miles south of York. Taking advantage of his offices at St. Mary's Abbey in York, Fountains, and Selby and of his position as one of the commissioners "for ordering of bells, chalices, and other church goods" (Ibid.) for Yorkshire, Beckwith steadily amassed considerable property in Selby and elsewhere in the county. He served as High Sheriff of Yorkshire in 1550, the same year in which he was knighted by King Edward VI, and he died in 1557.The terms of his will suggest that he remained faithful to Roman Catholicism throughout his years of service to three Protestant regimes.

Prior John de Landa's Accounts

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: MonasticDocument category 1: Priors' or abbots' accounts
From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place: Bolton Priory
Relevant material from 1315 to 0
Prior John de Landa's account includes a reward to the boy bishop of York in 1315.

Boroughbridge Record

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: DiocesanDocument category 1: Metropolitical and diocesan visitation articles and injunctions
Jurisdiction 2: ParishDocument category 2: Churchwardens' accounts
From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place: Boroughbridge
Relevant material from 1589 to 0
The Diocesan Visitation of 1589 provides evidence of the celebration of a traditional local custom at Boroughbridge, the election of a \'summer lord\'. The injunction to the churchwardens of the parish suggests that the ecclesiastical authorities aimed to control, but not to suppress apparently, the festivities associated with the parish event.

Doncaster Records

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: CivicDocument category 1: Financial accounts (eg, chamberlains' or bailiffs' accounts)
Jurisdiction 2: CivicDocument category 2: Assembly rolls or council minute books
Jurisdiction 3: Star ChamberDocument category 3: N/A
From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place: Doncaster
Relevant material from 1457 to 1642
Doncaster\'s records of performance, which range from 1457 to 1642 (the end of the period covered by REED) illustrate the various kinds of performance activity (musical, theatrical, customary, and ceremonial) and the various kinds of documents (personal, financial, legal, and administrative), that provide evidence of it.

The numbers at the top right of each entry (DN01, DN02, etc) correspond to the document descriptions that follow. Items marked with an asterisk (*) appear in the left margin of the documents. Letters in italics mark the extension of abbreviations used in the manuscripts. Square brackets ( […] ) set off material that has been crossed through. Caret brackets ( <…> ) set off places where damage has resulted in the loss of material.

Fewston Records

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: Star ChamberDocument category 1: N/A
Jurisdiction 2: DiocesanDocument category 2: Metropolitical and diocesan visitation articles and injunctions
From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place: Fewston
Relevant material from 1596 to 1622
Fewston Records

The records of performance activity in the small village of Fewston arose from conflicts occasioned by rushbearings in 1596 and 1619 brought to the Church of St. Matthew and St. Lawrence. The conflicts led to charges heard in the Archdiocesan Court of York and the Court of Star Chamber. At the time of the first case, Nicholas Smithson was the vicar of Fewston, though he was not directly involved. In the second case, Smithson and three of his sons were the principal defendants, arguing against the complaint of Thomas Herryson, a local husbandman, that they had violently resisted the performance of the local custom and openly criticized King James\' Book of Sports as contrary to the law of God.

In the transcriptions, italics indicate the extension of an abbreviation in the manuscript; an asterisk (*) precedes an item in the left margin; and caret brackets (<…>) set off material that is illegible or lost because of damage.

Fountains Abbey Records

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: MonasticDocument category 1: Priors\' or abbots\' accounts
From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place: Fountains Abbey
Refers to location(s): Yorkshire, West, Fountains Abbey
Relevant material from 1455 to 1458
Fountains Abbey was founded in 1132 in the valley of the River Skell southwest of Ripon. Given the natural advantages of the location, Fountains quickly became a prosperous Cistercian community. After economic setbacks in the late 13th- and early 14th-century, Fountains gradually recovered its wealth and influence. By the mid-1450s, the house was attracting many performers: minstrels, boy bishops, fools, story-tellers, players, and a Corpus Christi play. While most of these individuals and troupes had noble patrons, others were identified by their association with a place: Ripon, York, Beverley, Boston, Durham, Topcliffe, Thirsk, and Fountains Abbey itself.

Caret brackets (<…>) set off damaged or illegible parts of the document. Italics are used to indicate extensions of abbreviations. A single quotation mark (\') indicates that the abbreviation mark is omitted or ambiguous.

John Taylor's 'Summer Travels' 1639

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: MiscellaneousDocument category 1: Travellers' accounts
From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place: Kiddal
Relevant material from 1639 to 0
During the summer and early fall of 1639, John Taylor, the 'water poet', travelled from London to various places throughout the north of England. During his journey from York and Tadcaster to Leeds, Taylor (along with two Drovers and 35 hogs) enjoyed an evening's entertainment provided by a tinker with a Banbury kettle-drum in an alehouse in Kiddal.

Leeds Records

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: Star ChamberDocument category 1: N/A
Jurisdiction 2: DiocesanDocument category 2: Metropolitical and diocesan visitation articles and injunctions
From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place: Leeds
Relevant material from 1594 to 1621
Although we have not civic records that document performances in Leeds, the diocesan court of York and the Court of Star Chamber provide evidence of music during the time of divine service, two rushbearings, and two defamatory songs. All the records involve influential civic leaders, such as John Harrison, the \'benefactor of Leeds\'; John Metcalfe, deputy bailiff; Robert Cooke, vicar; and his successor in that office, his brother and curate, Alexander Cooke. The records provide evidence of the conflicts arising from the efforts to strengthen and develop the religious, economic, and political institutions of the borough.

The format of the allegedly libellous songs in both the Star Chamber cases is editorial: we have set the songs as verse to facilitate the reading of them and to break up the single block of text produced by the court scribe.

Methley Records

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: FamilyDocument category 1: Household accounts
Jurisdiction 2: FamilyDocument category 2: Journals/Diaries
From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place: Methley
Relevant material from 1443 to 1614
Methley: Records of Performance

The ancient village of Methley and, just to the west, Methley Manor were located about eight miles southeast of Leeds near the confluence of the River Aire and the River Calder. The records of performance in the manor house, home of Sir Robert Waterton, include a celebration of Hogmanay during the Christmas season of 1443-1444 and rewards to travelling musicians. For the village of Methley, we have evidence of several performances of a parish play and a rush-bearing at Whitsuntide in 1614. In both cases, we are fortunate that these records survive, for they are found in sources largely devoted to other matters: Richard Whitwood's manorial account and Richard Shann's personal miscellany or commonplace book.

Document Descriptions and Notes appear after the transcriptions of the records. The transcriptions have been marked up in accordance with the following editorial procedures:

Italics mark extensions of manuscript abbreviations.
A horizontal line | marks the end of a folio or page.
Square brackets [ ] set off text crossed through or otherwise cancelled. Caret brackets < > set off damaged text.
Asterisks set off material in the left margin.
Superscript circles set off material in the right margin.

DISCLAIMER: The material below is offered in pre-publication form. It has not received editorial attention from REED’s staff paleographers and Latinists, nor have the notes and other editorial apparatus been checked for completeness and accuracy.

Sheffield Records

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: CivicDocument category 1: Financial accounts (eg, chamberlains\' or bailiffs\' accounts)
From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place: Sheffield
Refers to location(s): Yorkshire, West, Sheffield
Relevant material from 1511 to 1637
Located at the confluence of the Rivers Don and the Sheaf, Sheffield remained a relatively small town through the later medieval and early modern period. Although it was not favourably located for visits by travelling players, Sheffield maintained its own waits, rewarded musicians when its semi-annual courts met, and had an annual fair, apparently with a horse show which, on one occasion at least, included a dragon from York. The one record of dramatic activity is a list of payments related to a play, perhaps of St. Margaret in 1511. For records of Sheffield and the region, we are indebted to John Wilson of Broomhead, who collected and preserved many early documents and transcribed others that are not longer extant.

Extensions of abbreviations appear in italics. Square brackets set off material crossed through or cancelled; it illegible, the material is represented by a series of full stops.

Slingsby Household Accounts

Download PDF Warning: Use of undefined constant upload_files - assumed 'upload_files' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /home/homeblue01/2/dng0zz12/public_html/wp-content/themes/professional/display_records.php on line 116
Jurisdiction 1: FamilyDocument category 1: Household accounts
From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place: Slingsby of Red House
Relevant material from 1610 to 1628
The Slingsby family was established in the Knaresborough area from the fourteenth century, having the manor and extensive estates at Scriven, and property elsewhere in the West Riding. In the sixteenth century they also acquired the manor house at Scagglethorpe, commonly called "The Red House" and the nearby manors of Moor Monkton and Wilstrop. The original Red House was replaced in the early seventeenth century by the one whose remains partially survive, having been partly demolished and refaced in the nineteenth century, converted into a school in 1902, and in the present century adapted again as private dwellings.

The builder of the new house was Sir Henry Slingsby, knight (1560-1634), who lived there with his wife, Frances Vavasour (d. 1611), by whom he had 14 children. [...]

The accounts also document expenses at private houses: Walton in August 1614, Bishopthorpe at Christmas that year, and Hickleton in January 1620-21. Walton was probably the house of Sir Henry’s daughter Alice and son-in-law Thomas Waterton 3 miles south east of Wakefield; the house of Sir John Jackson, where Sir Henry also stayed in 1614, and in January 1620-21, is probably at Hickleton, 6 miles north west of Doncaster. The grand Elizabethan house there, built by the lawyer Sir Francis Rodes for his son Peter, was in the ownership of the Jackson family by 1606. It was replaced by a new hall in the 1740s; Bishopthorpe was probably the Archbishop of York’s seat, 2½ miles south of York.

These transcriptions have been prepared by Sylvia Thomas and Ted McGee and appear with the permission of the Yorkshire Archaeological and Historical Society and Special Collections, Leeds University Library.