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Prior of Holy Island’s Accounts

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Jurisdiction: MonasticDocument category: Priors' or abbots' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Holy Island (Map)
Relevant material from 1342 to 1537
Holy Island (or Lindisfarne) was historically the most significant of all the Durham cells, and one of the oldest Christian sites in Northumbria. Given by St. Oswald to St. Aidan as the seat of his new bishopric in 634, it had also been the seat of St. Cuthbert, and hence of the Community of St. Cuthbert, from which the Priory, City and Bishopric of Durham were all derived.

Sacrist of Coldingham’s Accounts

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Jurisdiction: MonasticDocument category: Priors' or abbots' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Coldingham (Map)
Relevant material from 1363 to 1367
Coldingham had been the site of a famous Anglo-Saxon monastery, which was re-founded by 1139 following grants to Durham Priory from the Kings of Scots. Wars between the English and the Scots led to disputes over control of the monastery, which ended with Durham’s loss of control (to Dumferline) in 1462.

Master of Farne’s Accounts

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Jurisdiction: MonasticDocument category: Priors' or abbots' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Farne (Map)
Relevant material from 1432 to 1537
Great Farne Island was famous as the hermit retreat for St Cuthbert, and from the mid-12th century provided a semi-ermitic life for one or two monks from Durham.

Prior of Finchale’s Accounts

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Jurisdiction: MonasticDocument category: Priors' or abbots' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Finchale (Map)
Relevant material from 1365 to 1529
Originally founded as a hermitage by St. Godric in the early 12th century and bequeathed to Durham priory when he died, Finchale became one of the richest of the cells and a place where Durham monks frequently took retirement or holidays.

Master of Jarrow’s Accounts (1313-1314)

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Jurisdiction: MonasticDocument category: Priors' or abbots' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Jarrow (Map)
Relevant material from 1313 to 1314
Founded in 685 as part of the famous twin monastery of Wearmouth, it was famous as the home of the Venerable Bede (c.637-735).

Master of Jarrow’s Accounts (1402 - 1537)

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Jurisdiction: MonasticDocument category: Priors' or abbots' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Jarrow (Map)
Relevant material from 1402 to 1537
Founded in 685 as part of the famous twin monastery of Wearmouth, it was famous as the home of the Venerable Bede (c.637-735).

Prior of Lytham’s Accounts

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Jurisdiction: MonasticDocument category: Priors' or abbots' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Lytham (Map)
Relevant material from 1346 to 1534
Lytham Priory was founded on the north bank of the River Ribble between 1189 and 1194, as a result of a gift from Richard Fitz Roger, a local magnate. It was a relatively prosperous cell that, at times, had a rather mixed relationship with its mother house and with local landowners.

Prior of Stamford's Accounts

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Jurisdiction: MonasticDocument category: Priors' or abbots' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Stamford (Map)
Relevant material from 1383 to 1533
The Priory of St. Leonard outside Stamford was in existence by 1146; it may have been founded by Durham Priory out of a desire for a cell south of the Trent.

Master of Wearmouth’s Accounts

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Jurisdiction: MonasticDocument category: Priors' or abbots' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Wearmouth (Map)
Relevant material from 1362 to 1534
Founded by Benedict Biscop in 674, Wearmouth had been Bede’s first monastery. Along with Jarrow, it was re-founded ca. 1075, having previously succombed to Viking attacks. In the later Middle Ages it was a small and rather impoverished cell.

Durham Priory Hostillar's Accounts (1302-1529)

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Jurisdiction: MonasticDocument category: Obedientaries' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Durham Priory (Map)
Relevant material from 1302 to 1529
The chief responsibility of the Hostillar was for the welfare of guests. Because he derived part of his income from his lordship of the manor of Elvethall, which was in the parish of St. Oswald’s Elvet, he makes a number of contributions to the parish Boy Bishop known as the ‘Bishop of Elvet’. Durham Priory Hostillar''s accounts survive from 1302-1529, but only 1348-1481 contain relevant REED material (one or two membranes, total length of complete rolls 254-1503 mm., width 182-315 mm). Further information may be found in the introduction and textual notes.

Durham Priory Hostillar's Account (1300-1500)

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Jurisdiction: MonasticDocument category: Obedientaries' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Durham Priory (Map)
Relevant material from 1300 to 1500
Hostillar's Account

Durham Priory Cellarer's Accounts

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Jurisdiction: MonasticDocument category: Obedientaries' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Durham Priory (Map)
Relevant material from 1443 to 1444
The Cellarer’s main responsibility was to procure food.

Durham College Oxford Accounts

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Jurisdiction: MonasticDocument category: Priors' or abbots' accounts
Jurisdiction: SchoolDocument category: Accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Durham Priory (Map)
Places mentioned in this record: Oxford.
Relevant material from 1399 to 1402
Durham Priory began to send monks to study at Oxford in the late thirteenth century, but did not found its own college there until 1381, when the initiators of the foundation were Prior Robert Walworth and the dying Bishop Thomas Hatfield. Durham College prospered both academically and financially and became the forerunner of the present Trinity College; Dobson estimates that nearly half of all Durham monks studied there in the last 150 years of the priory’s history, and while this is an exaggeration, its educational importance to the Priory was clearly very great (Dobson, Durham Priory: 1400-1450 [London: Cambridge University Press, 1973], 343-359). We are grateful to Alan Piper for access to his unpublished detailed figures for each decade, which show that between 22 and 34 percent of all Durham monks who were alive at any one time had studied or were studying at Durham College). Because Durham College had no land, derived its income only from appropriated churches and was expected to maintain eight monks and eight secular scholars, together with all the buildings, books etc. that they needed, it was usual to keep the mother-house’s financial demands on it to a minimum. It is therefore surprising that its only two contributions to the Almonry Bishop of Durham date from the brief period when it was in financial difficulty.

Durham Priory Hostillars\' Accounts

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Jurisdiction: MonasticDocument category: Obedientiaries\' accounts
From region: County DurhamFrom place: Durham Priory (Map)
Relevant material from 1348 to 1481
The chief responsibility of the Hostillar was for the welfare of guests.1 Because he derived part of his income from his lordship of the manor of Elvethall, which was in the parish of St. Oswald’s Elvet, he makes a number of contributions to the parish Boy Bishop known as the ‘Bishop of Elvet’.

Aberford: Court of the Star Chamber: Silltoe vs. Thomson, etc.

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Jurisdiction: Star chamberDocument category: N/A
From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place: Aberford, Yorkshire, West Riding (Map)
Relevant material from 1620 to 1621
Aberford: Court of the Star Chamber: Shilleto vs. Thomson, etc., 1620-21. The record comes from a case brought by Thomas Shilleto against Thomson, Pollard, Lofte, Dixon and others, accusing them of composing verses that denigrated Shilleto in his capacity as High Constable of Barkston Ash and, as a result, discredit him in the eyes of other officers of justice. The case also makes reference to Sherburn in Elmet, South Milford, Ferrybridge, Knottingley, and Pontefract.

Aldborough Records

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From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place: Aldborough, West Riding (Map)
Relevant material from 1585 to 1594
The village of Aldborough is located about 18.5 miles northwest of York. As an ancient parish, it included two townships in the old North Riding of Yorkshire, six in the West Riding, including the three that appear in the records: Aldborough, Boroughbridge, and Roecliff. Relevant REED material appears in the Manorial Court Roll for 1585 (held in the National Archives), the Diocesan Court Book for 1590-1 (Borthwick Institute) and the Diocesan Court Cause Papers for 1593-4 (Borthwick Institute).

Beckwith of Selby, Travel Expenses, Steward's Accounts

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Jurisdiction: FamilyDocument category: Household accounts
From region: Yorkshire, WestFrom place: Beckwith of Selby (Map)
Relevant material from 1551 to 1555
Sir Leonard Beckwith of Selbywas, according to W. Wilberforce Morrell "one of those enterprising individuals who elevated their social position and built up their houses on the ruins of the monasteries" (The History and Antiquities of Selby (Selby, 1867), 134.In 1541 Selby Abbey had been granted to Sir Ralph Sadler, who received licence from the king in the same year to transfer the manor to Leonard Beckwith. Selby was located on the River Ouse about 14 miles south of York. Taking advantage of his offices at St. Mary's Abbey in York, Fountains, and Selby and of his position as one of the commissioners "for ordering of bells, chalices, and other church goods" (Ibid.) for Yorkshire, Beckwith steadily amassed considerable property in Selby and elsewhere in the county. He served as High Sheriff of Yorkshire in 1550, the same year in which he was knighted by King Edward VI, and he died in 1557.The terms of his will suggest that he remained faithful to Roman Catholicism throughout his years of service to three Protestant regimes.