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 Prison rules and reform, 1865: a transcript

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31. Debtors may be permitted to work and follow their respective trades and professions, provided their employment does not interfere with the regulations of the prison; and such debtors as find their own implements, and are not maintained at the expense of the prison, shall be allowed to receive the whole of their earnings; but the earnings of such as are furnished with implements, or are maintained at the expense of the prison, shall be subject to a deduction, to be determined by the visiting justices, for the use of implements and the cost of maintenance.

32. Criminal prisoners, before trial, shall have the option of employment, but shall not be compelled to perform any hard labour.

33. On the acquittal of any criminal prisoner, or when no bill of indictment is found against him, such an allowance on account of his earnings, if any, shall be paid to such prisoner on discharge as the visiting justices may think reasonable.

34. Every male prisoners of sixteen years of age and upwards, sentenced to hard labour, shall, during the whole of his sentence, where it does not exceed three months, and during the first three months of his sentence, where it exceeds three months, be kept at hard labour of the first class for such numbers of hours not more than ten or less than six (exclusive of meals) as may be prescribed by the visiting justices, and during the remainder of his sentence shall be kept in like manner at hard labour of the first class, except where during such remainder of his sentence the visiting justices substitute hard labour of the second class for hard labour of the first class; provided that if the surgeon certifies any such prisoner to be unfit to be kept at hard labour of the first class during the whole or any part of the prescribed hours, such prisoner shall, during such whole or part of the prescribed hours, be kept at hard labour of the second class, unless the surgeon certifies that such prisoner is unfit to be kept at either class of hard labour during the whole or any part of such hours; provided that prisoners sentenced to hard labour for periods not exceeding fourteen days may, in pursuance of rules made by the justices in sessions, be kept in separate confienment at hard labour of the second class during the whole period of their sentences.

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